CFP Inequality and Integration in Times of Crisis; Swiss Sociological Association June 26 – 28, 2013

Congress of the Swiss Sociological Association June 26 – 28, 2013 at the University of Bern
Since Karl Marx first described the enormous social inequalities and their potential for social change at the beginning of industrialization in the 19th century, the origins, extent, and consequences of social inequality, as well the level of inequality which a society is willing to tolerate, have been major themes in sociology. Our discipline has taken on the theme of inequality in multiple areas ranging from research on unequal educational and labor market opportunities, unequal income distributions, gender and health inequality, and inequality in life expectancy, to mention only a few. There are innumerable national and international conferences devoted to these themes. Do we need yet another one? Is inequality still a problem in our society?
The answer to this question is undoubtedly yes. In particular, the economic crisis at the start of the 21st century underlines the fact that the theme of inequality has not lost its relevance. Above all, the European debt crisis inclines us to suspect that social inequality is growing. In comparison with economic boom times, almost all the European countries feel the pressure of stabilizing their economies and cutting back on public expenditures. This will also impact redistributional policies to reduce inequality and bring about new challenges for integration policies addressing the emerging disparities. At the same time as inequalities within European societies are exacerbated, disparities between states are also rising, which will likely have adverse effects on European unification, not to mention creating new challenges for Switzerland as well.
The European debt crisis came at a point in time when global environmental and demographic problems worsened simultaneously – the aging of industrialized countries and population explosion in developing countries. The inequality effects of climate change and the unequal distribution of population growth will lead to an increase in migration and elevate the immigration pressure on the European Union and Switzerland. For this reason, Switzerland, as well as the other European countries, grapple with questions of managing migration and integration.
Inequalities – as problematic they may be – are also in some sense an opportunity. They increase the diversity of society and can bring about new ideas, innovation, and growth. Our desire and ability for social integration depends, above all, on the ultimate balance between these advantages and disadvantages. Within the framework of the various foci of the research committees, the conference will concentrate on the opportunities as well as the risks associated with these social changes.
Call for Organizers
If you would like to organize a plenary session, please submit the title of the plenary as well as the designated contributions (including titles, abstracts, and the names of the contributors) to the organizing committee by January 15, 2013 (by e-mail to sgs- kongress2013@soz.unibe.ch). A plenary session usually includes three contributions.
If you would like to organize a workshop (parallel session), please submit the theme proposal and call for papers for the workshop to the organizing committee by November 30, 2012 (by e-mail to sgs-kongress2013@soz.unibe.ch). After the organizing committee accepts the proposal, the call for papers will be published. The organizers of the workshop are responsible for collecting the submissions and selecting the contributions to be included in the workshop. The final program of the workshop (including titles, abstracts, and the names of the contributors) has to be submitted to the organizing committee by March 15, 2013 (by e-mail to sgs- kongress2013@soz.unibe.ch).
Information
Further information about the conference can be found on our homepage: www.sgskongress2013.unibe.ch

 

EGOS 2012 Helsinki CFP: Markets in the Making: Observing, Measuring and Performing Economic Exchange

CONVENORS

Liz McFall, Open University, UK,
e.r.mcfall@open.ac.uk

Steven Kahl, University of Chicago, USA,
steven.kahl@chicagobooth.edu

Joeri Mol, University of Melbourne, Australia,
jmol@unimelb.edu.au

This EGOS 2012 Helsinki subtheme revolves around markets; the way they work or more accurately the way we think they work. Theories of markets are not innocent or neutral. Markets (or rather their failure) not only form the raison d’être for organizations (cf. Coase, 1937), but also constitute a dominant logic in contemporary organizations (Friedland & Alford, 1991; Thornton, 2002). They affect economic practices in all manners of ways: which markets are analyzed, how markets ‘in the wild’ are analyzed, how they work and fail to work, are all questions where models form, inform, or perform practice (Callon, 1998; MacKenzie, Muniesa, & Siu, 2007).

Accounts of markets are wide and varied. Rational choice theory accompanied by methodological individualism has dominated how neo-classical economists view the market, this being particularly prominent in the Efficient-Market Hypothesis (Fama, 1970). Sociologists, seeing markets as ensnared in a web of social relationships, have investigated how norms and values mitigate the uncertainties underlying economic transactions (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983; Fligstein & Dauter, 2007; White, 1981). Contesting the notion of atomistic trading partners, sociologists have emphasized how economic agents are acculturated into embedded exchange through compliance with reigning market institutions. Critical management scholars have stressed that the increasing adoption of market thinking in organizations facilitates subordination through the ‘financialization’ of labor relations (Adler, Forbes, & Willmott, 2008). Social studies of markets (Callon, 1998; MacKenzie et al., 2007) and cultural economy (du Gay & Pryke, 2002; Pryke & du Gay, 2007) contend that markets are not immune to inquiry and observation, claiming that many of the practices, tools and devices that are used in markets are heavily influenced by centuries of economic thought, both lay and academic. And finally, anthropological studies of markets have even challenged the privileging of expertise that such social studies entail (Riles, 2010).

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INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM IN HEIDELBERG/GERMANY 20-21 OCTOBER 2011 “The privatization of higher education: Private investments for the common good?

Privatization can be considered one of the most important and contested trends in contemporary higher education. Although literature suggests different (more or less polemic) ways to conceive of the term, an unbiased working definition of “privatization” should focus on the increasing level of private contributions to the provision of higher education. Hence, privatization refers to both, the creation of private training and research institutions as well as to the introduction of private capital into public institutions. The rapid spread of privatization in higher education systems across the world and the growing variation of its forms and practices raise a set of complex questions for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in education we would like to address.

The objective of this conference is to generate a theoretically informed discussion that is international and multidisciplinary, cross-cutting multiple lines of political ideology. By addressing the dangers as well as the potentials of privatization in higher education, we would like to contribute to the further elaboration and differentiation of the concept.

The call is open to contributions based on empirical data (qualitative and quantitative) as well as to high-quality theoretical and/or ‘position’ papers. We welcome submissions from a range of relevant social science disciplines (for example, education studies, sociology, political science, economics, public administration, business and management and social policy) from scholars in all regions of the world, and from researchers at any stage of their career. Papers should be considering a range of issues including, but not confined to:

The “ideological” underpinnings of privatization: Evidence at the policy level Private investments as a new form of cost-sharing The expansion of private higher education New ways of organising academia: Between managerialism and new professional ethics? Global politics of privatization

For more information on the call, please refer to: http://www.csi.uni-heidelberg.de/Symposium_2011/

The deadline for submitting an abstract of max. 500 words is August 20th 2011. The international symposium will be held at Heidelberg University on October 20th to 21st, 2011.

Conference organizers: Dr. Kathia Serrano-Velarde

Tel +49 (0) 6221 54 11976 Kathia.serrano@csi.uni-heidleberg.de

Center for Social Investment (CSI)

Carsten Eggersglüß Tel +49 (0)6221 54-119-56 Carsten.Eggersgluess@csi.uni-heidelberg.de

Adenauerplatz 1 69115 Heidelberg/Germany

Just Out: Current Sociology Special Issue Reconnecting Professional Occupations and Professional Organizations

Edited by: Daniel Muzio and Ian Kirkpatrick

This collection seeks to reconnect two separate streams of work on professional organizations and professional occupations. In particular the articles collected here identify two key themes: (1) the challenges and opportunities that professional organizations pose for established and emerging professionalization projects and (2) the extent to which professional organizations create, institutionalize and manipulate new forms of professionalism and models of professionalization. To this effect, this collection brings together a number of articles from a broad range of disciplines (sociology, management, healthcare, accountancy, law and geography), theoretical backgrounds and national contexts which explore the complex connections between professional occupations and organizations.

CONTRIBUTORS: Julia Evetts;Roy Suddaby and Thierry Viale; Daniel Muzio, Damian Hodgson, James Faulconbridge, Jonathan Beaverstock, and Sarah Hall; Mirko Noordegraaf;Ian Kirkpatrick, Mike Dent, and Peter Kragh Jespersen; John Flood; Matthias Kipping; Frank Mueller, Chris Carter, and Anne Ross-Smith

Board 2010-2014

President
Paul DU GAY, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, pdg.ioa@cbs.dk
Vice-presidents
Elizabeth MCFALL, Open University, United Kingdom e.r.mcfall@open.ac.uk
Alan SCOTT, University of New England, Armidale, Australia alan.scott@une.edu.au
Treasurer
Elizabeth MCFALL, Open University, United Kingdom
Secretary
Kathia SERRANO-VELARDE, University of Heidelberg, Germany,katiah.serrano-velarde@csi.uni-heidelberg.de

Board Members
Cristina BESIO, Bielefeld University, Germany
Stewart CLEGG, UTS Sydney, Australia
Torben ELGAARD JENSEN, Technical University, Denmark
Antonio LUCAS, University Complutense, Spain
Daniel MUZIO, Lancaster University, United Kingdom
Dean PIERIDES, University of Melbourne, Australia
Robert VAN KRIEKEN, University of Sydney, Australia

Journal of Management Studies Call for Papers PROFESSIONS AND INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE Guest Editors: Daniel Muzio, David Brock and Roy Suddaby

Guest Editors: Daniel Muzio (University of Leeds), David Brock (Ben-Gurion University) and Roy Suddaby (University of Alberta)
There is a growing awareness of the critical role that professions play in advanced economies. Professionals and professional service firms are key advisors, analysts, defenders and developers of the major institutions that underpin capitalist economies. As gatekeepers to key financial institutions, the professions influence both the success and failure of capital markets. Professional service firms are also powerful economic actors in their own right, contributing over 3 trillion (USD) to the global economy. Professions influence more than the market system, however. They are also key agents of social change. As Scott (2008: 219) observes, “the professions in modern society have assumed leading roles in the creation and tending of institutions. They are the preeminent institutional agents of our time.”
Professions are, themselves, institutions which, over the last thirty years, have experienced profound changes. Professional service firms are increasingly adopting both the logic and structures of business corporations (Brock, et al., 1999). Professional identities are increasingly framed around logics of efficiency and commerce which have displaced traditional logics of ethics (Brint, 1994). Professional firms now tend to be multidisciplinary and transnational; a development which is eroding the value of traditional self-regulatory regimes and making the professional service firm the primary site of professional control and regulation (Cooper & Robson, 2006).
While we understand that professions are both key mechanisms for, and primary targets of institutional change, the precise role of professions and professional service firms in processes of institutional change remain under-theorized (Hwang & Powell, 2009; Scott, 2008). In this Call for Papers we propose a substantial re-theorization and empirical re-examination of professions and professional service firms and their relationship to the dynamics of institutional change.
Theoretically we seek papers that focus on the institutional work (Lawrence, et al., 2009) of professions in the context of business and the capital market system. Specifically, we are interested in research that theorizes the role of professionals and professional service firms in creating, maintaining and changing key societal institutions. We thus encourage submissions that focus on, but are not limited to: The role of professionals and professional service firms in creating, maintaining or changing key institutions within capital markets The role of professionals and professional service firms in creating, maintaining or changing key institutions within government and society The changing social, normative and ethical role of professionals and professional service firms The role of professionals and professional service firms in the diffusion of institutional logics Changes in status, identity, function and role of professionals embedded in corporations as in-house professionals (i.e. in-house lawyers, consultants, internal accountants etc.) The emergence of new forms of business professions and professional service firms
Empirically, we seek papers that document and analyse how broader institutional changes have impacted on professional services firms and their activities. We thus encourage submissions that focus on, but are not limited to:
Changes in the structure and organizational design of professional service firms (including multidisciplinary firms, publicly traded professional firms and transnational professional firms) The emergence and role of new managerial practices within professional occupations and professional service firms Emerging networks of professionals and professional firms (including alumni networks and global professional firm networks) Changes in the nature of professional work (such as the off-shoring professional services and the impact of new technologies) Changes in professional identities as a result of the increasingly organizational context of professional work Changes in the status and perception of professionals as a consequence of the increasing deregulation and fragmentation of the professions Changes in the power relationship between professions and clients
While much recent research has focused on traditional business professions (consultants, lawyers and accountants) we also encourage studies of professionals and professions that have received somewhat less analytic attention – such as engineering, health care, information technology and lobbying. We also encourage studies that examine multiple professions or the field as a whole.
We also encourage papers that challenge the assumptions of this Call for Papers – i.e. papers that question the extent of change in professional service firms, their role as agents of institutional change or the relevance of professionals and professional service firms as a managerial construct.
Papers may take varying methods and approaches: conceptual, theory building, meta-analytical and empirical. Recognizing the multidisciplinary nature of this area, submissions may draw on history, geography, political theory, sociology, economics and organization theory.
Procedure:
Submissions should be prepared in accordance with the JMS Style Guide for Authors: see http://www.wiley.com/bw/submit.asp?ref=0022-2380. Manuscripts should be electronically submitted by e-mail to professions.special.issue@googlemail.com. The deadline for submissions is December 31, 2010. Papers will be reviewed by the guest editors as soon as they are received and, if suitable for the special issue, immediately entered into double-blind review processes in accordance with JMS standard procedures. Please direct any questions regarding this Special Issue to the guest editors Daniel Muzio at dm@lubs.leeds.ac.uk, David Brock at dmb@bgu.ac.il, or Roy Suddaby at roy.suddaby@ualberta.ca.
References
Brint, S. (1994). In the age of experts: The changing role of professionals in politics and public life. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Brock, D.M., M. Powell, and C.R. Hinings, (eds) (1999). Restructuring the professional organization: Accounting, health care and law. London: Routledge.
Cooper, D.J. and K. Robson (2006). Accounting, professions and regulation: locating the sites of professionalization, Accounting Organizations and Society 31: 415–444.
Hwang, H. and W.W. Powell. (2009). The Rationalization of Charity: The influences of professionalism in the non-profit sector. Administrative Science Quarterly, 54(2): 268-298.
Lawrence, T.B., R. Suddaby and B. Leca. (2009). Institutional work: Actors and agency in institutional studies of organization. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Scott, W.R. (2008). Lords on the Dance: Professionals as institutional agents. Organization Studies, 29: 219-238.
Guest Editors: Daniel Muzio (University of Leeds), David Brock (Ben-Gurion University) and Roy Suddaby (University of Alberta)
There is a growing awareness of the critical role that professions play in advanced economies. Professionals and professional service firms are key advisors, analysts, defenders and developers of the major institutions that underpin capitalist economies. As gatekeepers to key financial institutions, the professions influence both the success and failure of capital markets. Professional service firms are also powerful economic actors in their own right, contributing over 3 trillion (USD) to the global economy. Professions influence more than the market system, however. They are also key agents of social change.

29th International Labour Process Conference: University of Leeds, 5th to 7th April 2011

The International Labour Process Conference is one of the longest
established and best known forums for the analysis of all aspects
of work and employment. As it approaches its 30th anniversary,
ILPC has earned a reputation as a cornerstone of empirical
research and cutting edge theoretical debate within the labour
process and sociology of work. Every year, the conference brings
together academics and policy makers from sociology, business
and management studies, industrial relations, organizational
analysis and a range of other disciplines to discuss developments
in the field, present their research and initiate new collaborations.
Call for papers now open at:
http://www.ilpc.org.uk/
The primary focus of the ILPC conference is work and its
The International Labour Process Conference is one of the longest
established and best known forums for the analysis of all aspects
of work and employment. As it approaches its 30th anniversary,
ILPC has earned a reputation as a cornerstone of empirical
research and cutting edge theoretical debate within the labour
process and sociology of work. Every year, the conference brings
together academics and policy makers from sociology, business
and management studies, industrial relations, organizational
analysis and a range of other disciplines to discuss developments
in the field, present their research and initiate new collaborations.
Call for papers now open at: http://www.ilpc.org.uk/

Call for submissions to a Gender, Work and Organization Special Issue on Gender, diversity and inclusion in professions and professional organizations

Call for submissions to a Gender, Work and
Organization Special Issue on
Gender, diversity and inclusion in professions and
professional organizations
The professions have historically suffered from poor records on gender, diversity and
inclusion, with many professional associations formally excluding women well into the 20th century. Of course, over the last 30 years, in the context of broader economic, social and legislative changes cross nationally, we have witnessed undoubted progress.

XVII ISA World Congress RC 17 News

The XVII World Congress begins on Sunday 9th July. RC17 members have put together a full programme of sessions including joint sessions with RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups and RC46 Clinical Sociology. In addition RC17, alongside RC02 Economy and Society, RC16 Sociological Theory and sponsored by the Journal of Cultural Economy, have organised an Integrated Session ‘Robust and Fragile?: towards a useful sociology of the economy’ chaired by Paul du Gay. Richard Swedberg will lead the session with a paper entitled ‘The Role of Senses and Signs in the Economy: more on the centrality of materiality’ with responses from Sylvia Walby, Carlo Tognato and Liz McFall. There will also be a business meeting on Friday 16th at 10.45 at T.307 Arkeologen to which we encourage existing and prospective members to attend.

Journal of Cultural Economy, vol 3, no. 2, July 2010 Franck Cochoy, Martin Giraudeau and Liz McFall “Performativity, economics and politics: an overview”

This special issue of the “Journal of cultural economy”, out this July, explores how theoretical formulations of performativity came, rather late in the day, to take centre-stage in debates about the relations between economies, economics, markets and poltics. If it took a while for Michel Callon’s (1998) observation that “economics does not describe an existing external ‘economy’, but brings that economy into being’ to be recognized as one of the major contributions to economic sociology, the fact remains that Callon was contributing to a debate that had long roots in a well-established – albeit lately re-invigorated by Judith Butler – tradition of linguistic philosophy and critical theory. This issue explores some of the reasons for the distance between philosophical formulations of performativity and its recent uptake within socio-technical studies of markets by bringing together key proponents and critics in an open debate between Judith Butler, Michel Callon, Paul du Gay and Christian Licoppe. These commentators are joined by authors including Timothy Mitchell, Philippe Steiner and Franck Cochoy among others who use empirical settings ranging from oil to human body parts and retail grocery to consider what, if any, relevance the framework has at a time when questions of failure – of knowledge, markets and economies – continue to loom large.